Reflections from Seminary Students

Film Review–The Debt

March 9th, 2012 § 0 Comments

The Debt, starring Helen MirrenSam Worthington and Tom Wilkinson, is a movie that is not easy to forget.  Not only because it involves Jewish Mossad spies hunting Nazis in the 60’s around Berlin, not only because there are moments that are unbearably creepy, but because The Debt is a perfect recipe for reconciliation.  And yet there is barely an ounce of reconciliation or redemption to be found.

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Downton Abbey–Series 1 Review

February 9th, 2012 § 0 Comments

Downton Abbey is an Emmy award winning Series from creator Julian Fellowes (Godsford Park).  The series focuses on a British family during the short years between the sinking of the Titanic and the start of World War I. The show is about the social and political entanglements of the Crawley Family, whose patriarch is the Earl of Grantham, as well as the extensive house staff for Downton Abbey itself.  Like Madmen, Downton Abbey is dialogue rather than action based and has a slower feeling than many modern shows.

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Book Review–The Sparrow

January 31st, 2012 § 0 Comments

I have decided that the most lavish picture of academic grace is glancing over a syllabus and seeing a novel assigned.  This quarter for Evangelism and Mission we are gifted with being able to read and discuss The Sparrow.

Mary Doria Russell’s first novel, The Sparrow, can be simplistically described as Jesuits in Space.  Her later novels, aside from The Sparrow and it’s sequel Children of God, are best described as historical fiction.  While The Sparrow is true science fiction, the novel is much more complex than just a mission to space, as the novel gets to the heart of what a life serving God entails–disappointment.  The story is not at all about telling aliens about Jesus, but rather about how mission can be a converting ordinance for the missionaries.

The Jesuit scientists wen to learn, not to proselytize.  They went so that they might come to know and love God’s other children.  They went for the reason Jesuits have always gone to the farthest frontiers of human exploration.  They went ad majorem Dei gloriam; for the greater glory of God.

They meant no harm.

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Book Review–Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

January 17th, 2012 § 0 Comments


Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is Jonathan Safran Foer’s (Author of Everything is Illuminated, you may have seen the film, and Eating Animals) 2005 New York Times bestseller, which was recently made into a movie.  The book is written in first person from the perspective of Oskar, a nine year old boy as well as through letters to Oskar from his grandmother and letters that his grandfather wrote.  Oskar is extremely unique, and possibly autistic, but because the book begins after Oskar’s father has died, it is possible that Oskar’s oddness, such as the refusal to wear clothing that is not white,  is merely his intriguing personality coupled with his curious coping methods. » Read the rest of this entry «

“I prefer baby Christmas Jesus, so that’s who I am going to pray to!”

December 23rd, 2011 § 0 Comments

Have you ever seen the movie, “Talladega Nights”? Its got Will Ferrell in it so it is naturally inappropriate but way funny. In the movie Ferrell plays Ricky Bobby who is a stock car racer who is quickly becoming one of the winningness stock car racers in the sport. Towards the beginning of the movie, while things are still going well for Ricky Bobby, Ricky leads his family in saying grace before a dinner of Domino’s, KFC, Wonderbread, Poweraid, and Budweiser. Check out the 3-minute clip below.

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