Reflections from Seminary Students

Telhu–A Foil to the Gospel

April 13th, 2012 § 0 Comments

One thing that I have done, to keep my sanity throughout seminary is to read novels.  Thanks to a very good recommendation from Josh I just finished The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, which can be described as a poetic Harry Potter meets The Lord of the Rings.  In The Name of the Wind there is a very interesting foil to the gospel.  I have always been a fan of the argument that the story of Jesus is true because it does not have the same elements as a fictional story. No Jewish man in his right mind would have women be witnesses to Christ’s resurrection as women were not seen to give credible testimonies. » Read the rest of this entry «

Thursday. Friday. Saturday.

April 4th, 2012 § 0 Comments

Throughout  my time in Seminary I cultivated a love of creating assemblage sculptures.   Assemblage is a form of sculpture where instead of cutting away at a chunk of stone, the sculpture is built up, typically using previously formed objects.  My work tends to focus on ordinary objects (terracotta pots, empty wine bottles, cement, copper wire, wood, glass, brick, and various other odds and ends).  My work also is largely religious in theme and is very, very amateur.  I have no formal training in assemblage, sculpture or art.  But it is a thing that I love and I find that creation in a visual sense lends to a concreteness of previously esoteric theological concepts.   I think of faith, community, sorrow, salvation, the imago dei, and compromise all in terms of sculpture.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Book Review–The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

March 30th, 2012 § 0 Comments

Stieg Larsson’s 2005 The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is a multi-layered crime/mystery novel.  Interestingly enough the entire Millennium Trilogy, or series, was published in Swedish after Larsson’s death in 2004.  The American version of the movie recently went to theaters, while the 2009 Swedish version is instant streaming on Netflix.  The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was originally titled “Men Who Hate Women,” which perhaps is a more accurate title due to the large number of misogynist characters and abuse of young girls and women.

The novel focuses around the mysterious Vagner family.  Henrik Vagner the patriarch of the Vagner family and retired CEO of the Vagner Cooperation hires a defamed journalist/reporter  Mikael Blomkvist to wirte a family biography and discover what happened to Henrik’s grandniece, Harriet.  Harriett disapeared in 1966, on Sweden’s Hedeby Island, and since then Henrik has been obsessed with discovering what happened to this young girl of 16 who was very much like his own daughter.  To compound his grief someone, presumably Harriett’s kidnapper, sends Henrik a framed flower every year on his birthday.  Mikael begins his very literal cold case in the dead of Swedish winter.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Book Review–The Hunger Games

March 23rd, 2012 § 0 Comments

The Hunger Games is Suzanne Collins first book in The Hunger Games Trilogy and the start of her second Young Adult series.  The protagonist and narrator, Katniss Everdeen, is a young woman of 16 trying to provide for her little sister and mother after her father was killed in a mining accident four years ago.  Life for Katniss is not always pleasant, particularly as she could be shot dead for hunting outside of District Twelve’s fence.  This illegal act of poaching and trespassing is the only way for Katniss to adequately feed her family; “District Twelve. Where you can starve to death in safety.”  The fact that the majority of people in District Twelve do not have adequate food is not the only concern that Katniss has about her district:

When I was younger, I scared my mother to death, the things I would blurt out about District Twelve, about the people who rule our country, Panem, from the far-off city called the capitol.  Eventually I understood this would only lead us to more trouble…Even at home, where I am less pleasant, I avoid discussing tricky topics. Like the reaping, or food shortages, or the Hunger Games.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Seattle Empty Bowls

March 16th, 2012 § 0 Comments

Empty Bowls is a grassroots organization formed for the soul purpose of fighting hunger across the world and was created by the non-profit Image Render.  According to the organizations website

The basic premise is simple: Potters and other craftspeople, educators and others work with the community to create handcrafted bowls. Guests are invited to a simple meal of soup and bread. In exchange for a cash donation, guests are asked to keep a bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world. The money raised is donated to an organization working to end hunger and food insecurity.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Arts & Culture category at School of Theology.