Reflections from Seminary Students

SERIES REVIEW: THE WALKING DEAD

October 31st, 2011 § 0 Comments

I really should not watch zombie movies anymore.  I had never really found them all that frightening.  That is until I was driving under a fairly long tunnel on my way to Bellevue and had a flashback to the tunnel scene in 28 Days Later (not to be confused with the movie 28 Days).  I even turned down a job once because of all of the zombie movies I watched on rainy October nights.  The job was night security officer at a biomedical lab in Southlake.  I did not want to be the one to discover, in the dead of night, that the cure for malaria that this lab discovered was actually an infection leading to the zombie apocalypse.  Despite the fact that I know better, I began watching the first season of The Walking Dead.

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A TINY REVOLUTION

October 17th, 2011 § 5 Comments

Someday I plan to own my own home. I also plan to build this house.  Of course, I will have to get some help from my Dad, who is a master at all things construction.  To date, while I am handy with a hammer, I have only successfully built a rickety tea shelf. With the downturn in the housing market as well as the economy and the fact that my generation is the first not anticipated to exceed our parents, this is the only kind of house I am likely to afford.  Let’s face it, ministry does not pay that well.

Tiny homes are more than just a fad in the housing market along with Cargotecture and houses constructed out of straw bales.  Tiny homes are a great way to cultivate a lifestyle of Christian stewardship and love for neighbor.  With the amount of over-sized and large mortgaged homes being foreclosed upon in America, a smaller home does make sense.  Tiny homes are typically around 100 ft², as opposed to the almost 2,500 ft² average American home.  Tiny homes can get as small as 64 ft² or as large as 200 ft² and are usually built on trailer hitches.  Trailer hitches make these tiny homes mobile and help the homeowner avoid government regulations.

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THEOLOGIAN THURSDAY – SAMUEL WELLS

October 14th, 2011 § 0 Comments

The single most influential book in my time at Seattle Pacific Seminary so far has been one that I would never have expected. It taught me a new language for my faith. And though I don’t use that language that often, the same language also offered me a new way of looking at the world and the Church.

When I thought of seminary and life-changing books and theologians, I first thought of all the magna opera that we expect to read, the staples of a theological education, like Augustine’s City of God, or Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae, or Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love. » Read the rest of this entry «

LESSONS FOR THE PULPIT – LEVI’S “LEGACY” AD by Heather Juul

October 10th, 2011 § 0 Comments

If you spent anytime inside this summer going to see a movie or looking at the fall previews on Hulu, you likely saw Levi’s Go Forth commercial entitled “Legacy“.  The ad is a bit controversial.  Glenn Beck accused “Legacy” of “glorifying revolution” thus leading to a boycott of the jeans by Beck and his followers. Due to the riots in London this August, the commercial was band in Britain because it contains scenes of protest.  The images of the commercial rotate between 20-somethings at the beach, kissing, dancing in and out of concerts, walking down crowded city streets or standing up to riot police.  The youth are portrayed as making their world better, by enjoying life and standing up for what they believe in. They just happen to be doing so in a pair of 501s. » Read the rest of this entry «

WORSHIP WEDNESDAY – TAIZE SINGING

October 5th, 2011 § 6 Comments

This is the first of our bi-weekly posts on worship. Every other Wednesday, expect to find both new and old ideas on worship practices, worship services, and philosophy and theology of worship.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Taizé community in France, an ecumenical, eponymous effort founded in 1940 in the village of Taizé, you may be in for a treat. First harboring refugees during World War II, it gradually evolved into an international monastic community that worships together, prays together, and is quite concerned about simplicity, peace and justice. Over 100,000 people make pilgrimages to Taizé each year. » Read the rest of this entry «

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