Latest Entries

The Christmas I Sat Next to a Sex Offender

By Jessica Eddings-Roeser

It’s not that I was afraid. My two brothers and I were grown—the youngest a six-foot tall Marine. Jim seemed weak and nervous most of the time, but my parents had realized that our hospitality was the most appropriate available.
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Pennies for a Conquistador

By Jessica Eddings-Roeser

Each morning I rose early to drink coffee and write. Then I put on black eyeliner and three-inch heels—my own carefully calculated self-image designed to sensationally guide unruly high school students before moving on to happy hour. Continue Reading …

“Walk in My Shoes”: Chris Hoke

In seminary classes I’ve learned how to read the Bible narratives. In English literature classes I’ve learned how to see deeper into fictional narratives. But in this MFA program, doing spiritual writing, or creative nonfiction, I’m finally put to work learning how to interpret my own stories, from childhood to jailhouse. Continue Reading …

Taming the Busy Trap

By Allison Backous Troy

If busyness is an addiction, then it feeds some desire that has been twisted and bent by wrongdoing. And, like anything else, that desire needs rehabilitation, a house of healing to set it aright. Continue Reading …

Heading Home on the Back Roads

By Dyana Herron

Here’s the hard part. We aren’t taught how to go back. We’re taught to move forward, toward something better, as quickly and efficiently as we can. Continue Reading …

Who Needs to Read Anymore?

By Vic Sizemore

And they have this new language they use, one I’m only slightly familiar with. This makes me nervous. Am I really the one who’s being left behind? Continue Reading …

A Story About Beauty

By Allison Backous Troy

My father served drinks and sold weed to keep occupied, to blur the sharp edges of boredom and restlessness that had followed him his whole life. Continue Reading …

Teaching and Seeing

By Dyana Herron

Not yet a month into the semester, my students and I move cautiously around one another like two parties in an arranged marriage, still unsure of what kindnesses or cruelties the other is capable. Continue Reading …

The Boy Who Lived Large

By Vic Sizemore

Tyler was sixteen years old. The service was nice. The pastor had lost a six-year-old daughter to asthma, and was particularly tuned in to the family’s pain. Continue Reading …

To See Her More Clearly

By Allison Backous Troy

Who was she to tell me to come home? How did she find out I was gone? What authority did she have to tell me—the one who knew more about being a mother than she did—to stop what I was doing? Continue Reading …



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