The two Books of homilies (copy dated 1676)

Steve Perisho, Theology and Philosophy Librarian, and curator of the Library’s Emmanuel Room, talks about a rare find in the Wesleyan, Wesleyan Holiness, and Free Methodist Collection and recounts the history surrounding this unique item. Lee Staman did the initial research into the Senkler family.

When the thirty-five-year-old Anglican priest John Wesley, six months or so after having felt his heart “strangely warmed”, 1 “began more narrowly to inquire into . . . the doctrine of the Church of England” 2, he turned to the Edwardian Book of homilies, and before the year was out had published a twelve-page condensation of three of them entitled The doctrine of salvation, faith, and good works (1738) 3. This “went through [twenty] editions in his lifetime and was a staple . . . [of] Methodist instruction.” 4 “The book which, next to the Holy Scripture, was of the greatest use to [the earliest ‘Methodists’] in settling their judgment as to the grand point of justification by faith,” he noted (looking back almost fifty years later in 1787), “was the Book of Homilies.5

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Notes:

  1. John Wesley, ed. Albert C. Outler (New York: Oxford University Press, 1980 [1964]), 66.
  2. Journal II, 101, as quoted in John Wesley, ed. Outler, 121.
  3. 13th ed., 1797:  http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00000069/00001.
  4. John Wesley, ed. Outler, 66, as corrected in Doctrinal and controversial treatises I, ed. Randy L. Maddox, vol. 12 of The works of John Wesley =The bicentennial edition of the works of John Wesley, ed. Randy L. Maddox (Nashville:  Abingdon Press, 2012), 29.
  5. Sermon 107, “On God’s vineyard.” Sermons III, 71-114, ed. Albert C. Outler, vol. 3 of The works of John Wesley =The bicentennial edition of the works of John Wesley, ed. Albert C. Outler (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1986), 505.  See also Michael Pasquarello, “Evangelizing England:  the importance of the Book of homilies for the popular preaching of Hugh Latimer & John Wesley,” Asbury theological journal 59, nos. 1-2 (Spring/Fall 2004):  151-159.

Catalog: How do I Find and Use eBooks owned by the SPU Library?

The SPU library owns eBooks through a variety of vendors and consortial agreements. They are located in our catalog and can be searched for in the same way you search for print items. While you are searching for materials for your next paper, you may find the book you want is an eBook. If that is the case, here are a few helpful pointers (and images that you can enlarge by clicking on them) to equip you to easily access eBooks.

How can you tell whether or not an item is an eBook in the catalog?

  • Underneath the title and author information, you should see the word “eBook” and an icon of a book with an orange “e” on it.
  • At the bottom left in the record listing, you may see the same orange “e” icon and a link to “View Now” which should take you to the book.

How do you access an eBook?

  • An eBook record listing must say Seattle Pacific University in the “Libraries that own this item” field in order to be accessed by our patrons. eBooks that say they are owned by “Summit” or “WorldCat” are not available to SPU students online. It may be possible to request the item in print format. Click on the “Editions and formats” link to determine whether this is an option.
  • You can access an eBook owned by SPU by selecting the “View Now” icon on the search results page, or, if that icon does not appear, click on the record.
  • You should be able to find the item in the “Find a Copy Online” section using the list of links found under “Seattle Pacific University Library” or “Other Libraries.”

Tips:

You may need to log in using your SPU credentials regardless of whether you are on or off campus. If the eBook is part of our Orbis Cascade Alliance shared resources, you may also need to select your institution and select a loan period between 1-7 days to download the item to your computer.

We have a plentiful selection of eBooks in every subject area, so do not hesitate to take advantage of these resources. If you know you want to search our catalog specifically for eBooks, try narrowing the search by using the filter bar on the left side of the screen

February Reading List

Want to catch up on your reading list of works by and about African Americans in honor of Black History month? Drop by the SPU library and take a look at the book display adjacent to the Circulation Desk to preview some of our relevant items.

Book display organized by Stephanie Rubesh, Access Services

New books you might want to add to your list of must-reads include:

I have a dream, by Martin Luther King, Jr.Kadir Nelson
An illustrated edition of Martin Luther King’s famous “I have a dream” speech.

 

Life upon these shores : looking at African American history, 1513-2008 by Henry Louis Gates
African American involvement in American history, society, politics, and culture.

 

Unspoken : a story from the Underground Railroad by Henry Cole
A wordless picture book.

 

For more items, including ebooks, owned by our library and related to African American literature, culture, and history, click here to view a WorldCat list.

Unique Library Collections

The SPU library has many unique collections featured throughout the building. Though some collection may have restrictions, knowing who to contact can make items in these areas more available to you. Here are a few specialized collections the library carries:

  • Northwest Regional Collection—Located on the second level of the library, along the wall next to the end room. The NW Regional books are secured behind a glass display case next to Seminar Room B. These are books about the Pacific Northwest, and a number of them are published by Ye Galleon Press in Eastern Washington. To view the books located in this collection, see this list. Most are available to be checked out for a normal four week period. Ask at the circulation desk to retrieve requested books.
  • Emmanuel Room Collection—Located on the second level of the library, at the end of the Administrative offices hallway. The Samuel J. Emmanuel Room houses the Wesleyan, Wesleyan Holiness, and Free Methodist Collection. Materials must be used in the room and may not leave the library except as approved by the Special Collections librarian. Contact Steve Perisho, Theology Librarian, to arrange access to the books in this room.
  • Work and Faith Collection—Located in the Graduate/Faculty Study Room on the third level of the library. These books relate to ministry in daily life, particularly focusing on faith and vocations. All patrons are welcome to enter Graduate/Faculty Study Room to retrieve items from the Work and Faith Collection. The items in this collection can be checked out for a normal four week period. To view the items in this collection, see this list. If you have any additional questions about this collection, contact Cindy Strong, Business Librarian.
  • Archival CollectionLocated on the lower level, in the far right corner of the building. The items in this collection document the rich history of Seattle Pacific University. Artifacts and papers of significance are stored in this secure repository, and can be accessed through appointment by contacting the University Archivist, Adrienne Meier. For more information regarding items in this collection, see this list.

To learn more about the unique collections featured in this article as well as additional collections found within our library, visit the Library Collections page on the website.

Welcome back to campus!

We hope the new quarter finds you recharged from the holiday and motivated to begin this next set of classes. The work load might seem light at the beginning, but a little extra work now can pay off later. Here are a few tips to help you succeed academically:

1) Review your syllabi early and make sure you have access to the books on your reading list. Visit the library catalog to see if the books you need for your classes are available at the SPU Library or through Summit Borrowing.

2) Choose research topics early and begin building your works cited or bibliography lists now. It can take time to find, read and synthesize the research on your subject.

3) Store your resource information online using RefWorks by clicking on the Cite/Export link in the item’s record. From there, you can also generate your bibliography using the full list of items you have stored or a selection from that list.

4) Stumped on ideas for research papers? Visit the library’s reference desk early in the quarter and ask to speak with the liaison librarian responsible for your discipline. While all reference librarians are trained to help you find the resources you need, you can receive invaluable assistance from the librarian who supports your subject area.

Best of luck to you as you navigate through the high waters of academia! Also, if you are a Twitter user, don’t forget to keep up-to-date on snow closures and holiday hours by following us @TheSPULibrary – where you may see a new side of the library.