New Library Discovery System for 2014

Dear Members of the SPU Community,

Beginning January 1, 2014, we will have a new search tool for finding materials in the SPU Library and Summit libraries. Our library is one of the 37 Summit libraries transitioning to this shared system, which will enhance the discovery and sharing of resources within the Orbis Cascade Alliance.

The new interface is similar to our current SPU WorldCat system and other search tools you may have used before: you search for books, articles, and more using a single search box and then select from various options to filter your results.

Here are some key changes to be aware of once the new system is live:

  • The “Classic Catalog” and SPU WorldCat will be replaced by the new system after December 31. Learn more here.
  • Signing in with your SPU username and password will maximize your search experience. Learn more here.
  • You will see new “Get It” and “View It” tabs under each title to help you access and request items. Learn more here.
  • Journals A-Z will become eJournals A-Z. Learn more here.

Additional information and guidance is available here.

If you have questions or feedback, please speak with the liaison librarian for your area or any member of the library staff.

Michael J. Paulus, Jr.

Q&A with Library Staff: Zach McNay

FaceZach McNay joins the SPU Library staff as our new Access Services Specialist. Learn a little bit about him below in our Q & A interview:

What are some things you are responsible for in your new position?

I am the weekend opener. It is a committed and tired crew of patrons that drag their bodies out of bed and into the library on the weekend. I say crew: let’s be nice to each other, and drink our coffee before we meet at the front desk.

I help with various tasks throughout the library, be it updating the library’s website, working to keep the Summit loan program working smoothly, or contributing to an odd post here and there on this very blog.

I’m also responsible for overseeing and training student workers. I want to help them have a positive and memorable job experience—library work can be fun!

What’s your favorite thing about living in Seattle?

I love the neighborhoods of Seattle, and travelling through them, and it’s fun to snap pictures of interesting things one runs across. Usually I begin at my favorite nook, “The Crumpet Shop”, down at the Pike Place Market. If you visit (and you should), try the crumpet with almond butter, marmalade, and blue cheese—simply the best. From there it’s easy to hop a bus to another neighborhood – walking around Capitol Hill I’ve found what is now my favorite music store in the city (Wall of Sound Records). I also stumbled across the Northwest Film Forum cinema and home office (a smaller cousin to the more well known SIFF cinema in lower Queen Anne), which has become a favorite spot of mine for viewing classic and foreign films on the big screen.

I just like knowing where things are in the city. As the years go by my mental map keeps expanding, and that is immensely satisfying. One thing I’ve learned though on my hikes: always bring an umbrella!

Any new book or movie recommendations?

I would recommend anything directed by Whit Stillman. His films are modern comedies of manners (a la Jane Austen), set in the elitist yet charming world of youthful old-money American preppies. We have his first three films, “Metropolitan”, “Barcelona” and “The Last Days of Disco” here at the library so check all of them out and have a marathon. If you’re in a more austere frame of mind, check out “Lancelot of the Lake” directed by Robert Bresson or “Stalker” directed by Andrei Tarkovsky.

When it comes to books, some of my favorites concern the lives and philosophies of particular filmmakers. I am currently re-reading Andrei Tarkovsky’s filmic autobiography “Sculpting in Time”, but you should certainly check it out once I’m done. Another to devour is the excellent “The Kubrick Façade” by Jason Sperb, an impassioned investigation of the meaning of the films of Stanley Kubrick (my own favorite director). Our collection of books about film at the library is rich and varied so dive in deep!

Q&A with Library Staff: Christina Nofziger

ChristinaChristina Nofziger joins the SPU Library staff as our new Access Services Specialist. Learn a little bit about her below in our Q & A interview:

Tell us a little about working at a Public Library and living in Kitsap County?

I worked for a public library in Kitsap County for seven years before coming to SPU.  Each day, I was privileged to help a variety of people with a variety of different needs. I did everything from baby story time to teaching students how to best use library resources for school projects to helping people track down books they wanted to read with very little information (“The cover was blue and I saw it on the Today Show…”) The library was a community gathering place so I also got to do some fun programming like author readings, Mystery Nights, art programs, and my personal favorite, a Zombie Prom!

I get the most joy in library work helping people find information that could potentially change their life. I’m very excited to be in an academic environment where I can use my passion for research and information to serve students and support SPU’s mission to engage culture and change the world!

Kitsap County is just west of Seattle via a short ferry ride. It’s a really beautiful area with lots of places to hike, camp and kayak. One of my favorite things to do is kayak along the Hood Canal and explore the little coves along the shoreline. For a day trip, Bainbridge Island and Poulsbo are great little cities to explore with lots of quirky shops and fantastic restaurants. Kitsap also gets regular visits from orca and grey whales!

What are some things you are responsible for in your new position?

I am an Access Services Specialist, and will help oversee student workers and the running of the front desk. I will be responsible for inventory and stack maintenance.

Any new book recommendations?

SO MANY! I love to read and I really love helping people find their next book. Feel free to stop by the library and talk to me about what you’ve enjoyed reading and what you would like to read next!

Most recently, I really enjoyed Echoes of Eden: Reflections on Christianity, Literature, and the Arts by Jerram Barrs. Dr. Barrs discusses the importance of culture as part of the human experience and why art appeals to us. Art often reflects what he calls “echoes of Eden” and is part of God’s general revelation: it reflects creation, the fallen world, and the longing for redemption. Creativity is a gift from God, the ultimate Creator, and Barrs makes a wonderful case that imagination and art can be vehicles for truth for image-bearing humans. He presents theoretical and doctrinal issues as they pertain to the arts and then applies these to five authors: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen.

* Photo is courtesy of Camarin Quinn Photography

Q & A with new Librarian, Kristen Hoffman!

Kristen Hoffman joins the SPU Library staff as our new Psychology and Scholarly Communications Librarian. Learn a little bit about her below in our Q & A interview:

Tell us a little bit about your career background?

I started my library career in the SPU library as an undergraduate student worker in 2000.  I knew I wanted to be a librarian one day, so I was so thrilled to work as a student at the circulation desk.  Once I graduated, I eventually found a public library job to gain a different library perspective.  I went on to work in five public libraries over the course of several years.  Most recently I’ve been at Biola University, where I was a Reference and Instruction Librarian.

What are some of the things you’re responsible for as the Psychology and Scholarly Communications Librarian?

I work with the School of Psychology, Family and Community to purchase or subscribe to library resources, teach information literacy sessions, and assist students with research.  I am also responsible for the new library role of scholarly communications – issues related to how SPU’s scholarly information is created, disseminated, evaluated, archived, and accessed.

Any new book recommendations?

The digital scholar: how technology is transforming scholarly practice. This is a book I’m reading related to scholarly communications and is a helpful resource on digital scholarship and open education issues.

Welcome to the team, Kristen!