Halloween Book List

DWCityWith Halloween around the corner, we decided to ask around the Library and see what the staff are recommending for a chilling read. If it’s classics you’re after, we do, of course, have options from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, to volumes by Edgar Allan Poe – but here are some outside the coffin box suggestions.

Snow White, Blood Red, by Ellen Datlow

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson

And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie

— Christina Nofziger

The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin

— Carrie Fry

Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America, by Erik Larson

— Johanna Staman

All Hallows’ Eve, by Charles Williamspumpkin pumpkin

— Michael Paulus

Pumpkin, Pumpkin, by Jeane Titherington

— Natalee Vick

(More) Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, by Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell

— Jo Krough

Dracula’s Guest: A Connoisseur’s Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories, by Michael Sims

When the Lights Go Out, by H.W. Wilson Co.

— Stephanie Rubesh

Also available through Summit:

Salem’s Lot, Stephen King

— Jake Crammer

House of Leaves, by Mark Danielewski

— Kevin Kayahara

Last but not least, check out this book by Stephen King’s son, Joe Hill, for a real Halloween scare.

Heart-Shaped Box, by Joe Hill

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Day of Common Learning

The 12th annual Day of Common Learning welcomed Dr. Thomas Maridada, director of National Education Policy, Practice, and Strategic Initiative for the Children’s Defense Fund, and a renowned leader in the world of education. This year’s theme was “Helping Youth to Flourish”, addressed by various afternoon showcases, a film screening of Girl Rising, and the keynote address “Transforming Our Youth – Transforming Our Nation: Partnering in Service to Invest in the Lives of Our Nation’s Youth”.  Forums covered topics from troubled youth to cultural backgrounds to volunteering to teaching.

This is what Maryann Shaw, Serials Specialist at the Library, had to say about Girl Rising:

Girl Rising was full of harrowing facts and statistics about life in developing countries for millions of girls, as well as personal first hand stories from the nine girls featured. But it also showed that by giving girls an education, their opportunities open up, and the change not only impacts them, but their families, culture and local economies as well. It reminded me how privileged I was to grow up in a community that values girls and supports their education. I loved that each of the girls were paired with a female writer from their country to help them tell their story, sometimes through song, dance, or poetry. Occasionally movies like Girl Rising can leave one feeling disheartened and powerless in the face of so much heartache and injustice, unsure of the best way to help. But Girl Rising shows how the gift of education for girls in the developing world—through advocacy and/or financial support—empowers the girls to be the agents of change in their own story, and in doing so create change for their communities.

The Library also sent out its first ever roaming Circulation Desk.  Related materials and a couple laptops were taken down to Royal Brougham to check books out to interested staff and students after the keynote address.

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If you are interested in more information regarding this year’s Day of Common Learning theme, our Librarian for Business and Education, Cindy Strong, created a reading list of available library resources and the book display on the main level of the Library will carry some of these books until the end of this week.

The View (from Downstairs)

Here is the latest message from Ryan Ingersoll, Head of Library Technology at the SPU Library:

As the Tech Desk continues to evolve, we want to keep you up-to-date on all the new services and products we’ve added.

Last year, the Tech Desk added multiple items for check out including iPod touches, audio recorders, Flip cameras, and MacBook Pros for use within the library. This year, we’ve extended the list to include a Canon Rebel T5i DSLR camera that is available for check out for three days at a time.

In addition, every study room on the Third Level is now equipped with a 46-inch LCD screen that connects to your mobile device (tablet, computer). They are perfect for collaborating on projects where everyone needs to see the screen. If you need HDMI or VGA adapters, they are available for check out at the Tech Desk. Each study room also has mobile furniture - feel free to configure tables and chairs to meet your specific needs.

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Our staff is trained to provide assistance with many of the technology tools we provide, and our knowledge base provides helpful tutorials and tips on these tools also. We are also here if you need help using the new printers (including scanning JPEG images or PDFs), or setting up wireless printing on your Mac or PC.

Visit our website for more information or schedule a one-on-one consultation by emailing librarytechdesk@spu.edu

Q&A with Library Staff: Christina Nofziger

ChristinaChristina Nofziger joins the SPU Library staff as our new Access Services Specialist. Learn a little bit about her below in our Q & A interview:

Tell us a little about working at a Public Library and living in Kitsap County?

I worked for a public library in Kitsap County for seven years before coming to SPU.  Each day, I was privileged to help a variety of people with a variety of different needs. I did everything from baby story time to teaching students how to best use library resources for school projects to helping people track down books they wanted to read with very little information (“The cover was blue and I saw it on the Today Show…”) The library was a community gathering place so I also got to do some fun programming like author readings, Mystery Nights, art programs, and my personal favorite, a Zombie Prom!

I get the most joy in library work helping people find information that could potentially change their life. I’m very excited to be in an academic environment where I can use my passion for research and information to serve students and support SPU’s mission to engage culture and change the world!

Kitsap County is just west of Seattle via a short ferry ride. It’s a really beautiful area with lots of places to hike, camp and kayak. One of my favorite things to do is kayak along the Hood Canal and explore the little coves along the shoreline. For a day trip, Bainbridge Island and Poulsbo are great little cities to explore with lots of quirky shops and fantastic restaurants. Kitsap also gets regular visits from orca and grey whales!

What are some things you are responsible for in your new position?

I am an Access Services Specialist, and will help oversee student workers and the running of the front desk. I will be responsible for inventory and stack maintenance.

Any new book recommendations?

SO MANY! I love to read and I really love helping people find their next book. Feel free to stop by the library and talk to me about what you’ve enjoyed reading and what you would like to read next!

Most recently, I really enjoyed Echoes of Eden: Reflections on Christianity, Literature, and the Arts by Jerram Barrs. Dr. Barrs discusses the importance of culture as part of the human experience and why art appeals to us. Art often reflects what he calls “echoes of Eden” and is part of God’s general revelation: it reflects creation, the fallen world, and the longing for redemption. Creativity is a gift from God, the ultimate Creator, and Barrs makes a wonderful case that imagination and art can be vehicles for truth for image-bearing humans. He presents theoretical and doctrinal issues as they pertain to the arts and then applies these to five authors: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen.

* Photo is courtesy of Camarin Quinn Photography

Book Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Growing up, Jacob Portman thought his Grandpa Portman was the most fascinating person he knew. He had fought in wars, crossed oceans and deserts, joined the circus, and spoke at least half a dozen languages. The stories Jacob loved the most were the stories about Grandpa’s life in a Welsh children’s home. Grandpa claimed it was an enchanted place, on an island where the sun always shined and nobody ever got sick or died. The island was designed to keep him and his friends safe from the monsters who were after them for their mysterious and magical abilities. Jacob never doubted his grandpa’s colorful stories, after all, he had spooky photographs and crumbling, hand-written letters to their truth.

As he grew older, Jacob began to doubt the existence of children who could fly, or turn invisible, or lift boulders. He believed the stories were a coping mechanism for Grandpa to deal the tragedies of World War II. He asked for stories less and less, until Grandpa no longer told them. However, after a tragic family event, his grandfather’s cryptic last words, and a mysterious letter from a Miss Peregrine, Jacob decides to search for his grandfather’s childhood home and the truth. His journey leads him to an island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers a crumbling orphanage. As he explores the decrepit island and dilapidated halls, discovering more haunting photographs and dusty letters, he learns the children who once resided there were much more than peculiar: they may have been unsafe, banished to the island for a reason, and they are, impossibly, still alive.

Written around found vintage photographs that are interspersed throughout the text along with handwritten letters, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is filled with beautiful, haunting, richly detailed imagery and prose. The photographs and text together build a suspenseful story that alternates between fantasy and reality, past and present. Part coming-of-age story, part time-traveling fantasy, part mystery, part art project, but wonderfully strange and fully unique. Fantasy and thriller fans will enjoy this novel. Fans of David Lynch, Lemony Snickett, and Tim Burton will find this appealing as well.

Tim Burton will be directing the film adaptation, set for release in 2015. The sequel to the book, Hollow City, will be published in January 2014.

The call number for this book is PS 3618 .I3985 M57 2011 in the Juvenile section.

                               – Christina Nofziger, Access Services Specialist