Book Review Tuesday

Bird Sense:  What It’s Like to Be a Bird byTim Birkhead

birdsense

Ever been called a “bird brain”? Well, after reading Bird Sense:  What It’s Like to Be a Bird by Tim Birkhead, you might take this as a compliment rather than a criticism.  Writing with a deft sense of humor, this British author dedicates individual chapters to the senses of seeing, hearing, touch, taste, smell, magnetic sense, and emotions. At times, the writing may be a bit technical for nonscientists or amateur ornithologists, but the variety of species mentioned and the facts discussed are fascinating.

For example, did you know that an owl’s asymmetrical ears contribute to its keen sense of hearing or that a Kiwi can smell earthworms through 15 cm of soil?  (Remember, these types of facts may prove useful should you ever become a contestant on “Who wants to be a millionaire?”.) The illustrations by Katrina van Grouw are also fetching, but a note of caution: What It’s Like to Be a Bird may not be appropriate dinner time reading. Learning about contact wearing robins is one thing, but some of the dissection sequences quite another. A final takeaway is the overall sense of the remarkableness of these relatively small feathered creatures. One cannot help but recall Jesus’ words in Matthew 10:29-30: “Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care. And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.”

The library call number for this item is QL698.B57 2012.

-Becky Paulson, Acquisitions Librarian

Footnote: This review is dedicated to the family parakeets Pickles (the three ounce bully!) and his sidekick Petunia

2013 Friends of Library Lecture: “Presenting Culture: The Curator as Steward, Critic, and Provocateur,” by Gregory Wolfe

When: Thursday, April 18, 7:30 p.m.

Where: Upper Gwinn Commons

The 2013 Friends of the Library Lecture will be delivered by Gregory Wolfe, founder and editor-in-chief of Image: A Journal of the Arts and Religion, writer-in-residence at Seattle Pacific University, and founding director of SPU’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. In addition to building a variety of literary programs and institutions, Wolfe is a prolific author of essays, reviews, and books, including Beauty Will Save the World. He will speak about the curator’s roles as a protector of artistic tradition, an arbiter of taste, and a creative force in his or her own right.

The Friends of the Library Lecture is an annual public lecture started for and sponsored by the Friends of the SPU Library. Members of this group contribute to an endowment that strengthens the library’s resources and enhances its ability to support the discovery, creation, and sharing of knowledge at Seattle Pacific. To learn more about Friends of the Library program, visit the library’s giving site.

FOL Lecture Poster 2013

Going to College in the Fifth Grade

Every year, the SPU campus and library host fifth graders from Dearborn Park Elementary school. The objective of this annual event is to introduce the students to a college environment early so they can begin thinking, planning, and preparing for their own academic possibilities and subsequent journey. The students participate in programs in the Physics and Physical Education department on campus, eat at our cafeteria, and hunt for information at the library to find resources for their State Report projects, in conjunction with their Social Studies class. Cindy Strong, the Education and Business Librarian, organizes the library portion of the event.

Today, fifty Dearborn Park fifth graders participated in the event with twenty-five SPU students assisting them. Many of our library staff also contributed their time and efforts to help make this event a success. It has been a highlight of our academic year for the past nine years, and this fall, a student who attended a past Going to College in the fifth grade day enrolled as a freshman at SPU.

To the fifth graders at Dearborn Park Elementary School – we hope you had a blast today, and will seriously consider Going to College in the “thirteenth” grade as well.

Book Review Tuesday: Special Collection Exhibit

Palmer, Walter C., M.D.  Life and letters of Leonidas L. Hamline, D.D., late one of the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church. . . .  New York:  Published by Carlton & Porter, 200 Mulberry-Street, 1866.

A month in which we have been reminded that the papacy, at least (if not, as in Methodism, the episcopacy), is an office, not an order, seems a good month to remember “Elder” Leonidas Lent Hamline (1797-1865), important for many reasons other than his precedent-setting resignation, not least his articulation of the principle that General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church had the constitutional authority to suspend a  bishop for slaveholding; the contribution he made to the foundation of Hamline University; and the support he gave to the Holiness revival led by Phoebe Worrall Palmer (1807-1874). This copy of the 1866 Life by Phoebe’s husband Walter (1804-1883) was given to the father of German-American Methodism, William Nast (1807-1899), by Leonidas P. Hamline, a son of the former bishop. It was given to Seattle Pacific by Dr. William Kostlevy.

Steve Perisho,Theology and Philosophy Librarian

Extended Hours Ends Tonight

The library blog will be on hiatus through Spring Break, so we will “see” you on the other end! However, If you need a last-minute study session before a big final tomorrow, drop by the library from now through midnight to take advantage of our Quiet Study Zone. Happy studying!