The View (from Downstairs)

Here is the latest message from Ryan Ingersoll, Head of Library Technology at the SPU Library:

As the Tech Desk continues to evolve, we want to keep you up-to-date on all the new services and products we’ve added.

Last year, the Tech Desk added multiple items for check out including iPod touches, audio recorders, Flip cameras, and MacBook Pros for use within the library. This year, we’ve extended the list to include a Canon Rebel T5i DSLR camera that is available for check out for three days at a time.

In addition, every study room on the Third Level is now equipped with a 46-inch LCD screen that connects to your mobile device (tablet, computer). They are perfect for collaborating on projects where everyone needs to see the screen. If you need HDMI or VGA adapters, they are available for check out at the Tech Desk. Each study room also has mobile furniture - feel free to configure tables and chairs to meet your specific needs.

screens

Our staff is trained to provide assistance with many of the technology tools we provide, and our knowledge base provides helpful tutorials and tips on these tools also. We are also here if you need help using the new printers (including scanning JPEG images or PDFs), or setting up wireless printing on your Mac or PC.

Visit our website for more information or schedule a one-on-one consultation by emailing librarytechdesk@spu.edu

Q&A with Library Staff: Christina Nofziger

ChristinaChristina Nofziger joins the SPU Library staff as our new Access Services Specialist. Learn a little bit about her below in our Q & A interview:

Tell us a little about working at a Public Library and living in Kitsap County?

I worked for a public library in Kitsap County for seven years before coming to SPU.  Each day, I was privileged to help a variety of people with a variety of different needs. I did everything from baby story time to teaching students how to best use library resources for school projects to helping people track down books they wanted to read with very little information (“The cover was blue and I saw it on the Today Show…”) The library was a community gathering place so I also got to do some fun programming like author readings, Mystery Nights, art programs, and my personal favorite, a Zombie Prom!

I get the most joy in library work helping people find information that could potentially change their life. I’m very excited to be in an academic environment where I can use my passion for research and information to serve students and support SPU’s mission to engage culture and change the world!

Kitsap County is just west of Seattle via a short ferry ride. It’s a really beautiful area with lots of places to hike, camp and kayak. One of my favorite things to do is kayak along the Hood Canal and explore the little coves along the shoreline. For a day trip, Bainbridge Island and Poulsbo are great little cities to explore with lots of quirky shops and fantastic restaurants. Kitsap also gets regular visits from orca and grey whales!

What are some things you are responsible for in your new position?

I am an Access Services Specialist, and will help oversee student workers and the running of the front desk. I will be responsible for inventory and stack maintenance.

Any new book recommendations?

SO MANY! I love to read and I really love helping people find their next book. Feel free to stop by the library and talk to me about what you’ve enjoyed reading and what you would like to read next!

Most recently, I really enjoyed Echoes of Eden: Reflections on Christianity, Literature, and the Arts by Jerram Barrs. Dr. Barrs discusses the importance of culture as part of the human experience and why art appeals to us. Art often reflects what he calls “echoes of Eden” and is part of God’s general revelation: it reflects creation, the fallen world, and the longing for redemption. Creativity is a gift from God, the ultimate Creator, and Barrs makes a wonderful case that imagination and art can be vehicles for truth for image-bearing humans. He presents theoretical and doctrinal issues as they pertain to the arts and then applies these to five authors: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen.

* Photo is courtesy of Camarin Quinn Photography

Book Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Growing up, Jacob Portman thought his Grandpa Portman was the most fascinating person he knew. He had fought in wars, crossed oceans and deserts, joined the circus, and spoke at least half a dozen languages. The stories Jacob loved the most were the stories about Grandpa’s life in a Welsh children’s home. Grandpa claimed it was an enchanted place, on an island where the sun always shined and nobody ever got sick or died. The island was designed to keep him and his friends safe from the monsters who were after them for their mysterious and magical abilities. Jacob never doubted his grandpa’s colorful stories, after all, he had spooky photographs and crumbling, hand-written letters to their truth.

As he grew older, Jacob began to doubt the existence of children who could fly, or turn invisible, or lift boulders. He believed the stories were a coping mechanism for Grandpa to deal the tragedies of World War II. He asked for stories less and less, until Grandpa no longer told them. However, after a tragic family event, his grandfather’s cryptic last words, and a mysterious letter from a Miss Peregrine, Jacob decides to search for his grandfather’s childhood home and the truth. His journey leads him to an island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers a crumbling orphanage. As he explores the decrepit island and dilapidated halls, discovering more haunting photographs and dusty letters, he learns the children who once resided there were much more than peculiar: they may have been unsafe, banished to the island for a reason, and they are, impossibly, still alive.

Written around found vintage photographs that are interspersed throughout the text along with handwritten letters, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is filled with beautiful, haunting, richly detailed imagery and prose. The photographs and text together build a suspenseful story that alternates between fantasy and reality, past and present. Part coming-of-age story, part time-traveling fantasy, part mystery, part art project, but wonderfully strange and fully unique. Fantasy and thriller fans will enjoy this novel. Fans of David Lynch, Lemony Snickett, and Tim Burton will find this appealing as well.

Tim Burton will be directing the film adaptation, set for release in 2015. The sequel to the book, Hollow City, will be published in January 2014.

The call number for this book is PS 3618 .I3985 M57 2011 in the Juvenile section.

                               – Christina Nofziger, Access Services Specialist

A Message from the Director: New at the Library

Dear Members of the SPU Community,

Welcome to a new academic year at SPU! The purpose of this memo is to highlight a few exciting changes at the SPU Library this quarter:

New hours: Beginning this week, the library has new, longer hours:

  • Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-Midnight
  • Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.
  • Saturdays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
  • Sundays, 10 a.m.-Midnight

More information about hours, including Reference Desk hours, is available from our hours website.

New technology: We have mounted large computer monitors in all study rooms on the 3rd Level, including the Graduate Study Room, and new print/copy/scan devices are located on every level of the library. For more information:

Tech updates in study rooms.

New speaker series: Come to the library Reading Room to hear members of the SPU community share scholarly and creative works in progress. Speaking this quarter:

  • Jeff Keuss (Theology), “The Gospel According to Stephen King”: Thursday, October 24, 3-3:40 p.m.
  • Shannon Huffman Polson (MFA ’12), “North of Hope: Memoir, Memory, and Mercy”: Thursday, October 31, 12:10-12:50 p.m.
  • Ben McFarland (Biochemistry), “The Quickening: How Chemistry Shaped Biology”: Thursday, November 7, 3-3:40 p.m.
  • David Wicks and Andrew Lumpe (Education), “bPortfolios: Using an Open Blogging Platform for Reflective Learning”: Thursday, November 14, 12:10-12:50 p.m.

For more information about this series, see the Creative Conversation site.

To find out more about the library and the many ways we support your work and the discovery, creation, and sharing of knowledge at SPU, visit us in person or online at http://spu.edu/library.

 

Michael J. Paulus, Jr.

University Librarian and Associate Professor

Seattle Pacific University

Interview with a Librarian: Liz Gruchala-Gilbert on USEM and Information Literacy

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What is the Library’s role in the USEM classes?

In the USEM classes, we aim to address the concept of information literacy. Graduates need to be information literate, have critical thinking skills, and be lifelong learners – and the Library works with faculty to make that happen.

USEM is our opportunity to meet all the new students – we probably have interaction with 90% of the first year students through USEM. When they come here we have the opportunity to take them on a tour – it’s a good time for us to introduce the Library to students in a fun way. I like to find out more about their experience with libraries – how they used libraries in high school, or how they use the public library – and then kind of bridge that to how they’re going to use this Library.

That also makes our interaction with new students an introduction to academic culture. They’re spending their first few weeks getting used to being at SPU…but there’s also an academic culture that they’re entering into. When they come here we show them how they’re going to be using more scholarly resources then they ever did before, and some of the nuts and bolts of using the catalog, getting things that are on reserve, and we talk about study habits. We try not to overload them because they’re learning so much in their first few weeks.

What is Information Literacy?

That’s a good question – I don’t know that there’s an agreed upon definition by everybody. First of all, there are different facets to Information Literacy. There’s the technology part where they have to know how to use technology, there’s the tool part where they have to know how to use the catalog, the data bases, and the books. There’s the evaluative part in which students have to know what makes a good source, and why they would be using it. They learn how to make judgments as to when to use the catalog, the databases, google, etc.

Then there’s applying that…how do you take all this data, all this information that you found and actually synthesize it into your paper and then how do you share that. It’s a big process.

Why would you say that Information Literacy is important?

Well on the most fundamental basic level it helps students do their projects and papers better. There are certain requirements that they’re going to have for papers. For example, a student might need five academic journals – so our job is to help the student find those academic journals. Our hope then is that those skills are transferable so that the next assignment the student gets, the student knows where to go and how to get help.

Do you help students figure out which sources are credible and which are not?

Yes. Credibility is incredibly important – sources need to be as credible as possible. Sometimes what I do is I’ll do a google search for a topic and take the first ten results. I divide my class into groups, each group will take one result, look at it, and then report back as to whether they would use it as a source for their paper. Who wrote something, what was their motive for writing it, who published it, is it on the web published by an individual or is it in a book published by a university press, how old is it, does it matter how old it is, who are they citing, are they citing reliable sources, are they citing anyone at all – these questions are all part of the discerning process.

What is your biggest piece of advice from a librarian’s standpoint to freshmen starting classes at college?

It’s so hard, but don’t procrastinate. We all procrastinate, but even little steps of starting early really help. The earlier students start gathering those the better, because it gives them more time to read and understand sources. If someone’s having trouble finding things then, it also gives them time to ask for help.