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Workshops and Professional Development

Faculty trainingThe following is a list of upcoming workshops.  We hope you can join us.  We are also happy to arrange a time to meet one-to-one to discuss any of these topics.  Just contact us!  You are also welcome to peruse past workshops.

2014 Workshops

September 3 – 9:00am to 3:00pm - Cremona 101

Diversity in a season of transition: Creating a more integrated academic community

Instructors: Raedene Copeland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Family and Consumer Sciences & Karen Gutowsky-Zimmerman, Ph.D., Professor of Art – Visual Communications

Co-sponsored by the Faculty Development Committee
As Seattle Pacific University examines the meaning, value, and need for a diverse campus and faculty, traditionally held beliefs and social challenges must be explored to ensure that significant, long-lasting strategies are implemented.  This course will educate and facilitate introspection and discussion amongst faculty within the context of SPU’s hiring goals and an increasingly diverse student body. Tools for engaging, motivating, and selecting individuals of diverse backgrounds will be shared to empower faculty in both classroom settings and administrative discussions.

Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 4 – 9:00 to 3:00pm - Bertona 1

Calling and clarity: Offering vocational guidance to students

Instructor: Doug Koskela, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theology & Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, School of Theology

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biblical and Theological Education

When college students seek vocational guidance, they often receive mixed messages from various influences in their lives.  These different voices give rise to a number of questions: should I look for the one path God has called me to take, or are there multiple possible paths on which I might live out God’s calling for my life?  Will my vocation make use of my gifts and passions, or—like Moses—will I be called to a task I neither want nor feel equipped to do?  Why do so many characters in the Bible experience a dramatic and unmistakable calling from God, whereas I’m not feeling any direction from God (and could really use some)?  In this course, we’ll explore an approach to calling and discernment that addresses these questions and prepares you to give helpful vocational guidance to students.

Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 4 – 9:00am to 3:30pm - Cremona 101

Teaching and learning essentials I: Starting with the end in mind

Instructor: Margaret Diddams, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial / Organizational Psychology & Director, Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development

Steven Covey wrote that successful people begin with the end in mind. The same is true for enhancing student learning by articulating course objectives, defining student learning outcomes and then deciding how to assess student attainment of those outcomes. This workshop will focus on syllabus development, student assessment strategies and course evaluation.

Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 5 – 9:00am to 3:30pm - Cremona 101

Teaching and learning essentials II: Creating meaningful learning experiences

Instructor: Margaret Diddams, Ph.D., Professor of Industrial / Organizational Psychology & Director, Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development

Building on the foundational strategies in T&LE I, and using research on how students learn, participants will design meaningful experiences in and out of the classroom to enhance student learning and other valued outcomes.

Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 5 – 9:00am to 4:00pm - Bertona 1

Introduction to fall 2014 Lectio: Genesis 1—Exodus 19

Instructor: Frank Spina Ph.D., Professor of Old Testament

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biblical and Theological Education

The only Scriptures Jesus ever read or appealed to as theologically authoritative were the Scriptures of the Synagogue, which Christians now refer to as the Old Testament.  The first section of these Scriptures in their Hebrew form is called Torah, a word that means law, teaching, instruction, even story.  This particular section is foundational to the rest of Scripture.  In the material that is the subject of this fall’s Lectio a number of crucial subjects are found, including creation and the election of Israel’s ancestors when creation needs restoration.  During this one day course we will highlight the salient issues: the nature of creation, God’s engaging of the created order, the nature and role of humanity, the themes of sin, judgment, and grace, the election of the ancestors, the rescuing of God’s people, and the eventful trek through the wilderness.

Open to full time & adjunct faculty and staff (with supervisor’s permission): Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


Sept 5th-Sept. 22nd, online

Introduction to teaching an online course

Instructor: Robbin Riedy, M.Ed., Assistant Director of Educational Technology

How do you establish a connection with students when you don’t meet with them face-to-face?

Can you really learn from someone who isn’t in the same room as you (or perhaps even the same state)? Research into how people learn, in addition to advances in easy to use technology means that effective teaching and learning online is possible. All you need are the right tools. Anyone who is thinking of teaching online in the future, or is already teaching online, is encouraged to sign up. You will gain hands on experience in building and facilitating an online course, learn best practices, and modify your current face-to-face learning activities for the online environment.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 15 – 9:00am to 2:00pm - Bertona 1

Speaking to students on faith questions related to God, suffering, and evil

Instructor: Daniel Castelo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theology

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biblical and Theological Education

One set of questions young people often struggle with has to do with the interrelationships between God, suffering, and evil, and given the events on our own campus, these may be even more pronounced for us in the days ahead. This course aims to offer resources for faculty from one particular theological vantage point on such questions, namely the “practical theodicy” or the “anti-theodicy” approach. This approach is deeply philosophical because it reckons with problematizing the framing of the pertinent issues as they currently often are, but it is also doggedly pastoral because it recognizes the complexity and pain of the human experience as very much theologically relevant concerns.

Limited to 25 participants: Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 16 – 10:00am-2:45pm - Cremona 101

Flipped learning: Strategies and application

Instructors: David Denton Ph.D.  Assistant Professor, Teacher Education & David Wicks Ed.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction.

The power of instructional technology excites the imagination of many educators. Promises of increased learning and greater efficiency, along with new technology tools and approaches, are sure to increase. And yet, some fundamental questions persist. When is it helpful to take instruction online? What are the characteristics of effective online lecture? How do other learning activities fit within a flipped model, if some instruction occurs outside of class?

In this interactive workshop, participants will identify characteristics of effective teaching and learning, in the context of adapting course materials to the flipped classroom approach, with special emphasis on developing online instruction.

Workshop goals include

    • Understanding when or when not to deploy content online
    • Integrating characteristics of effective online instruction
    • Practicing with hardware and software required for creating online content
    • Considering strategies for holding students accountable to interfacing with online resources

Limited to 20 participants: Open to full time faculty; staff (with supervisor’s permission) and adjunct faculty as space permits. In Lieu of honorarium, participants will receive a headset that they will also use during the workshop to produce and post an online recording.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 17: 9:00am to 3:00pm - Crawford 103

The Life and Legacy of John Wesley

Instructor: Doug Strong, Ph.D., Dean, School of Theology

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biblical and Theological Education

This mini-course introduces faculty and staff to the historical context and biography of John Wesley, his major contributions to Christian theological understanding and practices and the DNA that continues to influences SPU. Particular focus will be given to Wesley’s optimism of God’s grace and the extent that people can be transformed (made holy) through faith in Christ, as well as the importance of community for the Christian life. As a result of this course, faculty will be able to articulate the significance of the Wesleyan tradition for SPU’s approach to Christian education and to their particular vocations at SPU.

Open to full time & adjunct faculty and staff (with supervisor’s permission): Faculty eligible for $100 honorarium through the Center for Scholarship and Faculty Development.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 18 – 9:00am to 3:00pm - Bertona 3

Crafting your faith statement

Instructor: Rick Steele Ph.D., Professor of Moral & Historical Theology & Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, School of Theology

Co-sponsored by the Center for Biblical and Theological Education

The workshop will cover the Faculty Handbook requirements for faith statements and the expectations of the Faculty Status Committee as to the general form and content of these statements. It will also discuss strategies for coordinating individual faculty faith statements with the official SPU Statement of Faith (http://spu.edu/info/statement-of-faith.asp). (No attempt will be made, of course, to dictate what individual members should believe, or should say they believe.)

Open to 2nd year faculty who have completed the New Faculty Seminar: In Lieu of honorarium, participants may schedule a one-hour private consultation with Rick on the working draft of his/her faith statement, to be scheduled no later than two weeks before the due date of his/her file.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 22 – 10:00am to 11:00am - Library Classroom

Blackboard 101

Instructor: Robbin Riedy M.Ed., Assistant Director, Educational Technologies and Media

Blackboard really isn’t all that bad! Don’t listen to the rumors, come and see for yourself how you can make this tool work for your class. We will go through several scenarios so that you can learn how to create and grade assignments, facilitate a discussion group and more. This workshop will get you up to speed with the basics, update you on changes made to Blackboard over the summer, and get you using Blackboard tools in new ways. Bring your laptop!

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 23 – 10:00am to 11:00am - Library Classroom

Splashtop

Instructor: Robbin Riedy M.Ed., Assistant Director, Educational Technologies and Media & James Lim, MicroSystems Analyst, Computer and Information Systems

Would you like to seamlessly blend your lectures with small group discussions or other active learning activities? With the Splashtop application, it takes little effort to turn your classroom into an active learning space. You can be more in-touch with your class as you move away from the podium and sit among the students. Bring your laptop, iPad, Windows Surface or other device (you can use your iPhone if you have excellent eyesight!).

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 23 – 11:30am –to 12:30am - Library Classroom

Office 365

Instructor: Robbin Riedy M.Ed., Assistant Director, Educational Technologies and Media & Karen Tausher, Director IT Project Management, Computer and Information Systems

Did you know that every SPU faculty, staff and student has access to a ridiculous amount of free storage space through Office 365? Did you know that your SPU username and log in gives you access to free virtual classrooms, chat and file sharing? Have you heard of Yammer, and how it can be used in your class for grading work, giving students feedback and sharing information? Come and learn how to put this storage space to use. (Plus, if you hate Blackboard, you can run your entire course through Office 365, so that’s incentive enough for some of you.) Please bring your laptop.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


September 23-2:00PM To 3:00PM- Library Classroom

Poll Everywhere training

Instructors: Robbin Riedy, M.Ed., Assistant Director, Educational Technology and Media and Justin Gold, Poll Everywhere

Poll Everywhere gives faculty the ability to conduct polls in a variety of learning environments, including conventional, active, and online spaces. Beginning this fall, all faculty members will have access to a Premium Poll Everywhere account. This means that faculty can ask an unlimited number of polls to an unlimited number of students, they can run reports on student answers and best of all, answers can be recorded directly into the Blackboard Grade Center (feature coming this fall). Poll Everywhere is a great tool for formative assessment and quick comprehension checks. It keeps students engaged in the classroom and add an element of fun.

Registration for these events can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/20145etm


Faculty Learning Communities

In addition to workshops and one-to-one training sessions,ETM facilitates Faculty Learning Communities (FLC). A FLC is a voluntary, structured, yearlong, multi-disciplinary, community of practice or around 6-12 participants that includes building community and the development of scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). (2012 IATS) Past groups have researched and discussed a variety of educational topics, including Blended Learning, Active Learning, Flipping the Classroom, Adobe Connect, and iPads in Education.  Our 2014 learning communities are centered on the topics of Online Learning.  If you are interested in participating in a future faculty learning community, please contact us.

Read updates about this year’s learning community here: http://blog.spu.edu/etm/category/community-of-practice/

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