Practice Your Chinese at Tea Time

February 14th, 2017 § 0

Tea Time—to meet your classmates, make new friends, and practice Chinese.

No need to sign up. Just bring your lunch and join us every Wednesday.
Time:Wednesday, 12:30-1:30 pm
Location: Eaton Hall Lounge
我们每周三见!

Night Against Procrastination

February 9th, 2017 § 0


Specifically targeted for First Years and Sophomores (but all students are welcome, of course),Night Against Procrastination wants to get students in the Library on Wed., Feb 22, 2017 from 6 pm –12 am to finish up projects, study, and/or get help from tutors available at times below:

Writing 6-11 p.m.
Anatomy & Physiology: 6-11 p.m.
Chemistry: 6-10 p.m.
Biology: 6-9 p.m.
Psychology: 6-8 p.m.
Math: 6-11 p.m.

The librarians have committed to staffing up, too, and can help students with library research and those pesky citations.

In addition, there will be snacks (apples, nuts and carrots), pizza, raffles, and study breaks like Yoga and Zumba! NAP was a huge success last year and appreciated by those who participated.

NAP is hosted by the Library, the Office of Academic Affairs, the Center for Learning, the SPU Wellness Initiative, the Writing Center, and Ivy Honorary.

Career and Calling Workshops

January 26th, 2017 § 0

LAC logo

Come to any of the 18 sessions, including the session with Assistant Professor of Family and Consumer Science Raedene Copeland, who will share tips on how to “dress for success.” Other workshops include an opportunity for a professional headshot for Linked In profiles and alumni speaking on gap-year experiences and green careers. Our keynote speaker on Friday is Aaron Hurst, a social entrepreneur and author of The Purpose Economy. For more details and a complete list of the week’s events, visit the webpage.

Call for Papers

November 14th, 2016 § 0

e.g., the journal of exemplary undergraduate scholarship, is currently inviting submissions for their winter special issue on violence. This issue will consider violence in all its forms, from state-sponsored violence to the violence of political discourse. We invite submissions that engage and critique such forms of violence through a distinct disciplinary lens: literary or textual studies, political science, history, or a clearly articulated interdisciplinary approach.

Though a broad range of work addressing issues of violence will be considered for the special issue, contributors might begin by considering the following topics:

·  The aesthetics of violence in post-World War II British fiction

·  The rhetorical violence of electoral and political infrastructures: the two-party system, televised debates, or op-eds

·  The intersection between catastrophe and state violence as explored through mainstream media news coverage

·  The violent treatment of gendered bodies in Oscar-nominated films 2000-present

The focus of January’s special issue is violence, but we welcome submissions on any topic. Be aware that general submissions, if accepted, will not be published until a future issue at the discretion of the editorial board.

All submissions must be 5000-7000 words, in .doc or .docx format, follow MLA guidelines, and include a 250-word abstract outlining project goals and how the contribution meaningfully engages ongoing scholarly conversations. 

For non-traditional submissions (multimodal compositions), please submit via .pdf or .jpeg format and expand the abstract to 500 words. The extended abstract should include an explanation of the author’s design choices and how these choices meaningfully engage the theme of violence. Please also include contributor’s full name, academic affiliation and email address.

Deadline for January’s issue: December 1st

Please direct all submissions and questions to: egonline@uw.edu 

Tributes to English Department’s Rome Study Abroad: Art & Incarnation

October 28th, 2016 § 0

Here’s what Mary Dominguez, English major and just-graduated alum, has to say about the English Department’s Art & Incarnation study-abroad program in Rome, which is ramping up to take place in June:

“I chose Rome because the program is during the summer and because, it’s ROME. It’s an unreal city. And the experience is that much fuller with seasoned professors- I don’t think any question went unanswered. That trip forever has a piece of my heart.”

Another participant of the trip, Madeline McDonald, had this to say about her experience:

“Rome was a dream I didn’t even know I was dreaming of until I set my first steps in the charming cobbled streets of Trastevere. The heat was sweltering, the knowledge of art and literature that I gained more than I thought two people could share in such a short time, and the food was phenomenal. This trip was something I didn’t think could exist in such perfection. Of course it had its kinks and a recommendation I can thoroughly give is to engage in the exploration of the city on your own, but if all you do is listen to Dr. Kresser’s free-flowing lectures on art history, or Dr. Maier’s romantic tales of this glorious city, you will have experienced something wonderful and life-changing. I cannot recommend this program enough or tout it to more people. It is something I will always look back on fondly, and I hope that others are able to have similar and even better experiences than I had; this is a trip you do not want to miss.”

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